build IT Game Night

Join our Discord server by following this link: https://discord.gg/RrdxHSv.

When you enter Discord, familiarize yourself with the server guidelines in the #rules channel and assign yourself a role by reacting to the welcome message in the #welcome channel. Then, hop on the #Game Nights voice channel with your fellow builders!

Hedgehog Stuffed Animal

DIY Stuffed Animal

An easy DIY hedghog stuffed animal. Follow along or adapt it to make it your own!

Supplies

  • Scrap fabric/old T-shirt
  • Scissors
  • Pencil
  • Old pillow/pillow stuffing
  • Sharpie/ fabric marker/ buttons

Instructions

  1. Fold your fabric in half
  2. Sketch a peanut shape which will be the body of your stuffed animal
  3. Sketch a larger peanut shape 2 inches or larger than the smaller peanut shape
  4. Cut the larger shape out on both layers of fabric
  5. Cut slits about 1 inch apart towards the smaller peanut shape all the way around
  6. Then double knot the two pieces of fabric together all the way around, leaving a small hole to stuff the stuffed animal.
  7. After you’ve filled the stuffed animal, close up that hole by double-knotting the sides together.
  8. Add a friendly face with sharpies, fabric marker, or buttons.

Peanut Butter Oreos

Peanut Butter Oreos

I have no clue if this was a thing before I discovered it by simply dipping oreos into peanut butter

Info

Serving Size: As many as you want, just try to not make yourself sick. They can be a bit heavy

Calories: Who cares? These are delicious and worth every

Ingredients

  • A jar of Peanut Butter
  • Oreos (any work but I prefer double stuffed)

Instructions

  1. Grab a jar of peanut butter
  2. Grab an Oreos
  3. Dip the Oreo into the peanut butter (or be a bit more sanitary, and use a knife to spread the peanut butter onto the knife)
  4. Enjoy!
coloring-electronics

build IT Coloring Pages

Missing build IT and all its wonderful creative activities.

Well, the little robots have been working while the humans can’t coexist in the space.

Add your own color to these pages to fill in the blank on what they’ve been up to.

RED and BLUE’s Stay at Home Ideas

build IT is all about promoting creativity. Just because we’re not currently open doesn’t mean that has to stop! Making your own stop motion video can be a fun way to spend your time.

This video was made by student assistants Patrick Coh and Chris Potente working from home. Patrick created the animations and edited the video. Chris created the music.

3D printed objects were found on Thingiverse and linked below:

“Eunny” “Flexible Person with Tinkercad” found on Thingiverse- https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3879833

“alockey” “Creality Ender 3 Dog” found on Thingiverse-https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:3067755

“HPonstein” “Sofa Business Card Holder” found on Thingiverse- https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2414597

Things you’ll need for your own stop-motion video:

  • A camera with a tripod– it can be a phone camera and anything to hold it in place while you take pictures.
  • Inanimate objects– it helps if the object has a degree of flexibility or if you’re able to create multiple copies of the object in different poses.
  • Tape, glue, play-doh, fishing wire, pebbles– anything to help you secure the object in different poses while you take pictures
  • Your imagination

Steps:

  1. Come up with a story. Write down story beats and create a storyboard so that you have an idea of how you’ll frame your object and set up your camera before hand. Creating a storyboard can also help you figure out where you’ll hide your securing apparatuses in each scene. They can be simple, like stick figures or blobs, but they should be detailed enough so you get an idea of how your object will move.
  2. Split the storyboard into different shot sequences. Note when you’ll move your camera and what’s going to happen in between each camera movement.
  3. Play with your inanimate object, see how it moves and figure our how you’re going to shape it and hold that shape for each frame. Do some simple camera tests to see if your poses will read to the audience.
  4. Set up your scene. See if you’ll need any props or if you’ll need to adjust the lighting to liven it up. Maybe take some test pictures to make sure every action in your scene can be captured.
  5. Make a stop motion! This part can be tedious but it will pay off. Move the object from pose to pose keeping transitions in mind. Snap a picture between each movement. We found it helps to do several “takes” by animating and snapping pictures all the way through one sequence then resetting it. Make sure you watch each take before you move on! This way, you won’t get confused by trying to perfect every shot and you’ll get to see if the sequence works all together.
  6. Assemble your video. Drag your images into a video-editing software. The key here is organization! Make sure to separate different takes and scenes as you’ll likely have an overwhelming number of pictures. Depending on what video-editing software you’re using you may find it easier to either create image sequences or just put your images in one by one. There are pros and cons to both. With discreet images, while you may have a ton of photos, it may be easier to delete unnecessary frames, extend the length of a frame, or duplicate frames. With image sequences, your images are contained in one clip so while you can still do all those things, it may take longer to find frames within the clip.
  7. Add any music or sound effects. Create your own or read up on creative commons and reusing content in our article here.
  8. Add any other embellishments like visual effects, create a larger interactive project, or whatever else you can think of. The sky is your limit here!

 

Just Keep Patching

We can’t wait to see where your creativity takes you here at build IT! This series is dedicated to showcasing just some of the cool things you can make here.

Like what you see in this video? You can do it too! Just make sure you come by for an orientation and a Brother SE600 training before you start.

Supplies:

Thrifted Jacket- ~$10
Cotton Fabric– $5.73/yard
Embroidery Backing– $8.98/100 sheets
Thread- Varies, $2-6 per spool

Tools Used:

Designs were made using Photoshop and build IT’s Wacom Intuos Tablet.
Embroidery was done with Brother SE-600 machine in build IT.
Patches were hand-sewn to the jacket with needle and thread.

Design Tips:

  • Our Brother SE-600 machines have a max area of 100x100mm. Split up larger embroiders strategically or consider other options like heat transfer vinyl or iron-on transfer paper!
  • With that max size in mind, check your design to avoid tiny lines and details. Not only will it not turn out but it could also tangle up threads.
  • If you’re trying to get your design on thicker or stiffer materials, try making patches on fabrics like cotton and sew it on by hand instead! You’ll avoid breaking needles and you’ll get better quality embroidery.
  • Got large patches of one color in your design? Try to find fabric in that color instead of sewing it. It’ll probably be cheaper and it will cut down on embroidery time.

 

orientation-image

build IT Orientation

A RedID is required to attend this orientation workshop.

This orientation is required for anyone wanting to access build IT. It will provide a general introduction to the space, best practices and for its use, and importantly, an introduction to potential hazards, protective equipment, and other aspects of safe Makerspace use.

After this orientation, attendees will be given card access to use build IT during open hours.

Be sure to RSVP here

orientation-image

build IT Orientation

A RedID is required to attend this orientation workshop.

This orientation is required for anyone wanting to access build IT. It will provide a general introduction to the space, best practices and for its use, and importantly, an introduction to potential hazards, protective equipment, and other aspects of safe Makerspace use.

After this orientation, attendees will be given card access to use build IT during open hours.

Be sure to RSVP here

orientation-image

build IT Orientation

A RedID is required to attend this orientation workshop.

This orientation is required for anyone wanting to access build IT. It will provide a general introduction to the space, best practices and for its use, and importantly, an introduction to potential hazards, protective equipment, and other aspects of safe Makerspace use.

After this orientation, attendees will be given card access to use build IT during open hours.

Be sure to RSVP here